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Posted by: In: News 24 Aug 2016 Comments: 0

The NTA’s Standards, Assessment and Certification Council approved the applications for registration of three training institutions, at its meeting held on the 26th of July 2016. The institutions are Ngato Vocational Training Centre, Namibian Institute of Welding and NICHE Training Academy. Ngato VTC can now enroll trainees for the National Vocational Certificate in Business Services (Office Administration) Level 1, while the Namibian Institute of Welding is now registered to enrol trainees in the area of Coded Welding, which include plate carbon welding, pipe welding and stainless steel welding, from Level 1 to Level 3.
On its part, NICHE Training Academy received approval to enroll trainees for the National Vocational Certificate in Metal Fabrication, from Level 1 to Level 2. At the same meeting, the SACC also approved applications for the expansion of training scope of the following institutions:
• Namibian College of Open Learning (Rundu) – National Vocational
Certificate in Business Services (Office Administration) Level 1-3;
• Monitronic Success College – National Vocational Certificate in
Business Services (Office Administration) Level 1;
• Marco Mpollo Vocational Training Centre – National Vocational
Certificate in Business Services (Office Administration) Level 1 and
National Vocational Certificate in Bricklaying Level 1.

Speaking to The Stakeholder, Quality Assurance Manager, Ian Gicheru welcomed the approvals, noting that it demonstrated that the local VET market was responding to the need to free up more training opportunities for young Namibians. “We are delighted by the steady and solid growth. And I need to thank the training institutions concerned for their hard work and commitment in seeing to it that they meet the requirements, as set out in the Regulations for the Registration of Training Providers”, he said. Gicheru also encouraged institutions, not yet registered with the NTA, to do so without delay, noting that there were still institutions that mislead parents and prospective trainees into believing that they are indeed registered institutions, while they are not. “We invite all training institutions not registered with us to approach our offices and to access the necessary support and guidance towards preparing and submitting formal registration applications. It is the right thing to do”, he explained. He also called on prospective trainees to always establish whether a training institution was indeed registered with the NTA, before they pay any monies, including enrolment fees. “The list of registered institutions continues to grow making it difficult for us to share printed copies with stakeholders, including trainees. However, the NTA keeps an updated list of all registered
VET institutions and the scope of course offerings on our website. This list can be accessed through the link http://www.nta.com.na/?page_id=1022. Should people not be able to access the list via the website, they are welcome to visit our offices or call us at 061-2078557”, Gicheru highlighted. Gicheru expects more applications to be approved at the SACC’s next meeting, which is scheduled to take place on the 11th of October 2016.

Posted by: In: News 28 Jul 2016 Comments: 0

In line with the requirements of the Vocational Education and Training Act of 2008, and the Regulations Related to the use of the Vocational Education and Training (VET) Levy, the Namibia Training Authority may allocate an amount not exceeding 35 percent of the levies received for a financial year to cater for the funding of training interventions under the VET Levy’s Key Priority Training Funding Window.

According to the General Manager: National Training Fund, Joseph Mukendwa, it was against this background that the Board of Directors approved a list of focus areas to be supported from the Key Priority Grant allocation. “Following a thorough and detailed selection process, we have now identified a number of credible training institutions to offer training under this allocation and we are hard at work to finalise service level agreements with all these institutions”, he said.

The approved interventions include demand-led programmes identified in the NTA’s Skills Development Plan for the VET Sector (SDP1). “Under this area, accredited training institutions were invited in October 2015 through a public notice, to submit proposals for training in occupations identified in high demand as listed in the SDP1. Fifteen proposals were received, of which eight institutions met the criterion of accreditation with the Namibia Qualifications Authority (NQA)”, Mukendwa stated.

The interventions also include support to the NTA’s VET expansion programme, in particular the support of innovative approaches to training delivery and the establishment of production units at training centers. “The engagement of training institutions under this intervention is being implemented in two phases. While, we already engaged the public Vocational Training Centres (VTCs) under the first phase, the second phase involved the engagement of private institutions. I am glad to announce that in this regard, the Board approved the proposals of two local private institutions”, Mukendwa said.

Mukendwa also highlighted that the Key Priority Training interventions included a strong focus on the inclusion of People with Disabilities into the VET sector. “As an organisation, we are indeed very happy about this development as it ties in well with the support we have envisioned to render towards supporting inclusiveness in VET. We want to ensure that specialised equipment and training materials are made available and that training infrastructure are friendly to the needs of people with disabilities. I am therefore delighted that the Namibian Federation of the Visually Impaired (NFVI) has submitted a request for financial support to ensure training continuity at its service centre, where thirty-six individuals now stand to benefit from our funding”, Mukendwa highlighted.

Mukendwa noted that the NTA planned to stage a signing ceremony in the capital in July 2016 where it is going to enter into contracts with all the identified training institutions.“We plan to invite the media to this event to support us in getting the message out there that funds collected through the VET Levy are applied in a transparent and responsible manner towards ensuring that we invest in high-quality demand-led training for the benefit of our trainees and our industry stakeholders, at large. Growing more training opportunities under this funding window of the VET Levy will continue to remain a key priority for the National Training Fund, for the foreseeable future”, he noted.

Posted by: In: News 28 Jul 2016 Comments: 0

The public has responded overwhelmingly to a recent invitation by the NTA for eligible Namibians with advanced vocational and and technicals skills and hands-on experience in their respective fields to register for its current Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) Assessment Round.

NTA RPL Coordinator, Moses Tjirare says the NTA has identified RPL as part of its funding interventions under the Key Priority Training Grant Funding Window of the VET Levy. Such RPL assessments can result in recognised qualifications for the selected candidates, who will now undergo assessment within current industry standards and obtain qualifications that may add value to their personal portfolios. “We are very happy with the response. More than 500 applications were received. It clearly demonstrates the need for RPL, and going forward, we will have to work very hard to ensure that we extend this service to all industry sectors”, Tjirare explained. “Indeed, the Harambee Prosperity Plan expects about 2 000 individuals to be certified through RPL, by the end of the Harambee period”, he noted.

As far as those who missed out on the application deadline for the current RPL assessment round is concerned, Tjirare highlights that a second round is being planned for September this year. “Those eligible candidates who missed out on the current round should not despair. In fact, my advice to them is to start preparing their applications and portfolios for submission. We are going to focus on the same areas. However, the scope might also increase and discussions in this regard are ongoing. We will inform the public through the media”, he highlighted.

RPL is the process of formally recognising skills and knowledge acquired over years, regardless of how, when and where such learning occurred. Prospective applicants for RPL on Level 2 should have a minimum of three years relevant working experience, while a minimum of five years relevant working experience is required from applicants for Level 3. Such experience may include community work, volunteer work, previous training or any other relevant life experiences. Occupation-specific application forms can be accessed through the ‘Downloads’ section on the NTA corporate website www.nta.com.na , or collected at the NTA’s Assessment and Certification Division, Routh Street, Northern Industria, Windhoek.

Posted by: In: News 28 Jul 2016 Comments: 0

Altogether eleven local Electrical General trainers left the country on Tuesday, 19 July 2016, to participate in an intensive two-month training course at the internationally renowned Lucas Nuelle Institute, in Kerpen, Federal Republic of Germany.

The training intervention serves as a comprehensive response on the part of the NTA to national development objectives, as outlined in the Fourth National Development Plan (NDP4), the Education and Training Sector Improvement Programme (ETSIP) and the Harambee Prosperity Plan, which amongst others emphasise the need for local trainers to undergo technical and pedagogical upskilling and capacitation, through the upgrading of their qualifications and enhanced industry exposure.

VET Curriculum Implementation Manager, Ernst Eixab says the NTA engaged Lucas Nuelle Institute to ensure a tailor-made training programme, which suits the Namibian context by considering crucial issues such as the Namibian Unit Standards and the qualification level on the National Qualification Framework. “The training course is indeed very advanced and include a range of specialized courses. We are confident that our participants will meet expectations”, Eixab explained.

The training course is to cover the following key areas: Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering; Measuring Electrical Quantities; Effects and Dangers of Electric Current; Protective Measures and Accident Prevention Regulations; Repair Work and Modification, Creating and Interpreting Schematics, First Aid and Firefighting in Electrical Accidents; and Electrical Equipment Operations.
It is also to include a strong focus on measurement, systematic troubleshooting, electromechanical and electrical components, installations and pedagogy and didactics.

The participants will also have the opportunity to visit leading industry plants, whilst in Germany. According to Eixab, the skills, knowledge and experience gained from the training course can go a long way in contributing to improved quality in local Electrical General training. “We expect the participants to upon their return, share their newfound skills and knowledge with our Technical Working Groups (TWGs), especially as far as revising the set curricula and the setting of assessment papers are concerned. Indeed, they need to share their knowledge and skills to the benefit of the training-learning process”, he added.
Eixab also highlighted an expectation for the group of trainers to act as mentors to other Electrical General trainers at both public and private VTCs. “They will have to take up a leading role on learning platforms to share their skills and knowledge with their peers”, Eixab said.

Posted by: In: News 28 Jun 2016 Comments: 0

The Board of Directors of the NTA has announced the appointment of
Jerry Raymond Beukes as the organisation’s new Chief Executive Officer (CEO,) on a five-year term, effective 01 June 2016. Making the announcement in a media statement issued in Windhoek on the 2nd of June 2016, Board Chairperson, Otto Nakasole Shikongo congratulated Beukes on his appointment, emphasising that the Board was looking forward to the NTA and the broader Vocational Education and Training sector being the beneficiary of his proven leadership and management skills. Beukes had been acting in the capacity of CEO, since February 2015.

He holds a Master of Arts degree from the University of the Western Cape (UWC) and a Master of Business Administration degree from the Management College of Southern Africa (MANCOSA). Before joining the NTA in 2014 as its Chief Operations Officer, Beukes held the position of Director: Programme Development and Registration at the then Polytechnic of Namibia (now Namibia University of Science and Technology). The Stakeholder caught up with the new CEO and asked him a few questions:

SH: Few people know this about you, but you started out as a teacher. Tell us about your journey from teacher to CEO.
JB: It has been an exciting journey. I would not say that when I graduated as a teacher that the long- term goal was to be a CEO. However, somewhere in that first seven (7) months that I taught at Ella du Plessis High, I realised I liked being in leadership. With that in mind, I took a deliberate decision to leave teaching and to instead take on a wide variety of jobs in different functions and capacities to give me a breadth of understanding of the whole education sector. I have learned so much from different employers and really engaging in their cultures. I’ve picked up on different leadership styles and different strategies that work in different organisations and environments. I now have the opportunity to take the best of all of these experiences and create a culture I think is best suited for the NTA in living up to its mandate.

It will be an opportunity based on the appreciation that people are what make an organisation – That while you need talented people to be successful, people do not run themselves. That they are only as good as the people you have managing them.

SH: What leadership styles do you value? What is your leadership style?
JB: There are bits and pieces I have picked up from other leaders at all levels, during my career. Some were good at engaging and empowering the workforce, while others focused on prioritising the bigger issues. Some excelled at setting context to align people towards a common goal, whereas others taught me the importance of stewardship. Some taught me that you need excellent individual players who are also dedicated to playing as a team, whereas others taught me to strive for that all elusive balance between being task-oriented and people-oriented.

My own style is more of a motivator and
change agent. I really thrive in motivating
people to achieve an outcome and then turning them loose and watching them achieve, while
still holding them accountable for their results.
I devote the time necessary to make sure
everyone understands where and how he or she adds value and I try to have a personal
connection with everyone. As a basic principle,
I always endeavour to lead by example and
make a positive impact on the lives of people I interact with. It is not easy to do, but I think it is essential. That is my preferred style and that is what drives me.

SH: The NTA has gone through turbulent times over recent years, especially as far as the long-dragging disciplinary process against your predecessor and recent news reports that the NTA might be dissolved, are concerned. How do you plan to foster a cohesive corporate culture in the midst of such challenges?
JB: By being visible and communicative and respecting all levels of the organisation, from the general worker all the way up to the senior leadership team, the Board and our line Minister. You cannot over-communicate. And I will expect my management team to make sure we communicate effectively both inside and outside the organisation. We need to ensure that all our employees understand our strategic expectations, where we are relative to those expectations, and what role each and everyone has to play to meet those expectations.

I strongly believe we’re on the right path. We’ve got the support of our line Ministry and our Board. We’ve got a strong and robust implementation framework through our annual business plans and performance tracking mechanisms. We’ve got the support of stakeholders. We’ve got a team that’s going to make this transformation happen. It’s already happening.

SH: Before joining the NTA in 2014 as its Chief Operations Officer, you held a very senior position of Director: Programme Development and Registration at the then Polytechnic of Namibia (now Namibia University of Science and Technology). What motivated you to join the NTA?

JB: I grew up in Rehoboth – a community renowned for the quality of its artisans, especially in the construction industry. As such, I grew up appreciating and admiring first-hand how proud and skilled craftsmen – most of whom without any formal education – were able to provide for their families, and do so well. My late dad was a builder, so I experienced his craftsmanship and dedication first hand. It shouldn’t, therefore, come as a surprise to you when I say that I have indeed been a keen follower of the NTA since its establishment in 2008 and I have always wanted to be part of this exciting national assignment to establish a new and relevant national TVET system for economic empowerment, sustainable livelihoods and responsible citizenship.

While, I was equally excited by the
opportunities that came with the transformation of the Polytechnic into the Namibia University
of Science and Technology, I could not say no
to the opportunity to join the NTA as its Chief Operations Officer in 2014. Today, I am fortunate and humbled to now lead this very important organisation as its CEO.

SH: What, in your opinion, is the biggest challenge facing the local TVET sector?
JB: There are several. A lack of equitable access to training opportunities in all 14 regions, inconsistencies in the quality of training, the absence of a unified training system, a lack of qualified trainers, a lack of industry responsive training programmes in key areas, the availability of qualifications on higher levels that can articulate into higher education qualifications and transforming our overall TVET system into one that is demand-driven.

Perception about TVET, and the unfair bias against it remains a huge challenge. Yes, we live
in a society that still considers the TVET track
as a dead-end option fit for only the academically less-endowed. This dysfunctional bias is destructive to our children who should have the opportunity to be trained in whatever skills their natural gifts and preferences lead
them to. It is also destructive to us as a country. Many of the skills most needed to compete in
the global market are skills that fall into the
TVET domain. The absence of such skills has cost us, and is continuing to cost us as a nation.

SH: You have alluded to a lack of access to training opportunities. What are the NTA’s plans to address this challenge?
JB: The desire of so many Namibian children to enroll for TVET courses is clear for all to see, we still lack sufficient opportunities, as our training market is small. We owe it to our children to give them that chance, but we are not going to through good intentions alone. Making that happen at scale for the many, and not for the few, that will take real action.

And that is why the NTA’s Master Plan for the Expansion of Vocational Education and Training is of such importance. With the recent opening of the Gobabis Vocational Training Centre, the number of public
TVET institutions increased from seven to eight and the national TVET footprint has now been extended to also include the Omaheke region. Under the Master Plan, and in line with the Harambee Prosperity Plan, this footprint needs to be extended to other parts of the country where there are currently no such institutions. Although still under development, it is an ambitious plan. But, I say that while ambition may be the path to success, persistence is always the vehicle that gets you there. That is also why the NTA’s achievements should merely make our organisation determined to do more. The local training market is too small, period. We need to grow the market and we need to do so with rigour and determination. We owe it to our children to do it now, and to not wait.

SH: What is your vision for the NTA and the country’s TVET sector?
JB: The terms of the NTA’s assignment are clear. As an enterprise of the Government, it needs to spearhead the transformation of our TVET system into a mainstream activity for youth development and employment, entrepreneurship development, as well as human capacity building. That is the challenge. A credible TVET strategy must necessarily fit into our socio-economic context. In my opinion, the NTA’s rolling five-year strategy is proving itself credible in this regard. I therefore see my role in leading this transformation as one under which I need to now build on further mobilising our stakeholders in a concerted effort to create synergies and share responsibilities for the further harmonisation of our country’s TVET policies and programmes.

My vision is aligned to that of the NTA’s five-year rolling strategy set by our Board for the TVET sector, which is for the NTA to establish itself as the national port of call for technical and vocational skills, through the effective regulation and funding of training services and the sustainable delivery of quality technical and vocational skills, to the benefit of our stakeholders. And while I am aware that there exists no single model that guarantees success, I am sure I can improve the odds by making our transformation meaningful through modeling the desired mindsets, building a strong and committed team, and relentlessly pursuing impact. I am excited to do this work together.

Posted by: In: News 28 Jun 2016 Comments: 0

Members of the NTA’s various Industry Skills Committees (ISCs) attended an induction workshop in the capital on Friday, 10th June 2016.

Officially opening the workshop, NTA CEO, Jerry Beukes, commended the members for their proactive response to serve on the ISCs. “We felt it necessary to conduct this induction exercise to ensure that you add value to our mandate of establishing an efficient and effective training system by becoming competent and effective members of our ISCs, in the shortest possible time. We are confident that your expert contribution will better equip the NTA to address the training needs in your respective industries, and in our country, at large.” Beukes noted.

Beukes also highlighted the growing awareness that accelerated economic development depended on increasing the productive capacity of industries and that this in turn depended on developing a TVET system, which provided people with the skills needed by industry, and which provide citizens with access to employment.
“This closer alignment of training with the needs of the labour market is indeed a key objective of the Vocational Education and Training Act of 2008. As standing committees of the Board and comprised of senior people from industry, the ISCs helps us develop a training system driven by the needs of industry. This is done through a tripartite approach that involves a collaborative partnership between the NTA, training providers and industry”, Beukes explained.

The CEO also highlighted that as representatives of their respective industry sectors, the mandate of the ISCs was to ensure that the current and future training needs of their respective sectors are indeed recognised and incorporated into the NTA’s training plans and activities. “I cannot emphasise enough the importance of your ongoing input and involvement. The training priorities you will identify will inform the NTA’s programmes of action to develop the qualifications, unit standards and training programmes necessary to meet the skills needs in your industries. The industry intelligence you provide will be a driving force in developing the responsive and demand-driven VET system, so clearly envisioned in the VET Act of 2008”, Beukes highlighted.

The workshop included presentations by the NTA’s departmental and divisional heads, focusing on a wide range of topics about the organisation and its core functions, including the Application of the VET Levy; the VET Expansion Project; Registration of Training Institutions; Assessment and Assessment Services; VET Curriculum Implementation; the Development of VET Unit Standards and Qualifications; VET Advocacy and the 2016 National Skills Competition and Exposition.

Posted by: In: News 28 Jun 2016 Comments: 0

The NTA is inviting eligible Namibians with advanced vocational and and technicals skills and hands-on experience in their respective fields to register for its upcoming Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) Assessment Round.

RPL is the process of formally recognising skills and knowledge acquired over years, regardless of how, when and where such learning occurred. NTA RPL Coordinator, Moses Tjirare (photo) told The Stakeholder that many such candidates now had the opportunity to apply for RPL Assessment in selected occupational areas. “The NTA has identified RPL as part of its funding interventions under the Key Priority Training Grant Funding Window of the VET Levy. Such RPL assessments can result in recognised qualifications for many candidates. If selected, they will undergo assessment within current industry standards and obtain qualifications that may add value to their personal portfolios”, Tjirare explained.

Prospective applicants for RPL on Level 2 should have a minimum of three years relevant working experience, while a minimum of five years relevant working experience is required from applicants for Level 3. Such experience may include community work, volunteer work, previous training or any other relevant life experiences. Occupation- specific application forms can be accessed through the ‘Downloads’ section on the NTA corporate website www.nta.com.na , or collected at the NTA’s Assessment and Certification Division, Routh Street, Northern Industria, Windhoek.

Completed application forms should be hand-delivered or couriered to the NTA Head Office, Rand Street, Khomasdal, or one the following Vocational Training Centres (VTCs): Eenhana VTC; Rundu VTC; Okakarara VTC: Valombola VTC; Windhoek VTC; and Zambezi VTC.

Upon selection, applicants will be invited for an induction workshop where they will receive training in gathering and sampling evidence pertaining to the products of their work. Such evidence may include photographs, articles, letters, reports, testimonials, and reference letters.

Tjirare encourages eligible candidates to grab the opportunity and to submit applications before the deadline of Thursday, 30th June 2016.“Participating in this RPL assessment round will certainly enhance the knowledge and skills of a participant who will be formally awarded with a National Qualifications Framework-registered qualification, that in turn can boost career growth and exposure to lifelong learning”, he emphasised.

Posted by: In: News 02 Jun 2016 Comments: 0

2 June 2016

The Board of Directors of the Namibia Training Authority (NTA) is pleased to announce the appointment of Mr. Jerry Raymond Beukes as the organisation’s Chief Executive Officer (CEO) on a five-year term, effective 01 June 2016.
Mr. Beukes has been acting in the capacity of CEO since February 2015, during which tenure he has demonstrated strong leadership and strategic management abilities.
Mr. Beukes holds a Master of Arts degree from the University of the Western Cape (UWC) and a Master of Business Administration degree from the Management College of Southern Africa (MANCOSA). He has held senior/executive management positions in the education and training sector for the last 18 years.
Before joining the NTA in 2014 as its Chief Operations Officer, Mr. Beukes held the position of Director: Programme Development and Registration at the then Polytechnic of Namibia (now Namibia University of Science and Technology), where his primary responsibilities included leading and managing all programme development activities, as well as registering resultant qualifications on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF).
The Board congratulates Mr. Beukes on his appointment and looks forward to the NTA and the broader Vocational Education and Training sector being the beneficiary of his proven leadership and management skills.

SIGNED:

Otto Nakasole Shikongo
Chairperson – NTA Board of Directors

Posted by: In: News 23 May 2016 Comments: 0

The inaugural National Skills Competition and Exposition is to take place at the Ramatex Complex from the 14th to the 17th of September, this year.
Acting CEO, Jerry Beukes made the announcement at a media conference in the capital on Thursday, 19 May 2016.

Beukes highlighted the importance of the event as a key deliverable under the Namibian Government’s Harambee Prosperity Plan, which advocates for the staging of a “National Vocational Education and Training (VET) skills competition bi-annually, to promote VET as an education subsector of choice.

“It is also a deliverable under the NTA’s rolling five-year Strategic Plan to support the promotion of technical and vocational career paths amongst young Namibians, and to challenge societal perception under which such career paths are stigmatised as low-status options, with limited prospects for career advancement” he noted.

The event has two main components: A National Skills Competition, which is to serve as a platform from which to select Namibia’s competitors to represent the country at the next WorldSkills International (WSI) competition; and an exposition, in which credible and accredited local and international technical and vocational training institutions are going to participate and share information about their institutions and course offerings to young Namibians, wishing to embark on career paths within the VET sector.

The competition is open to all public and private training institutions and industry sectors. While the scope of occupational skill areas is expected to increase at future competitions, only the following 10 (ten) occupational skill areas will be staged at the inaugural competition. This is a strategic decision to keep the inaugural competition manageable to allow for a meaningful evaluation and to inform the development of a sustainable national skills competition framework.

The areas are Automotive Technology; Bricklaying; Carpentry; Cooking; Electrical Installation; Joinery; Plumbing and Heating; Refrigeration and Airconditioning; Wall and Floor Tiling; and Welding.
The National Skills Competition is to be preceded by a series of regional selection competitions at various training institutions from 27 to 28 May 2016 to select competitors to participate at the National Skills Competition. Only eligible competitors who meet age and other technical requirements as stipulated in the WorldSkills International (WSI) competition rules will be considered for representing the country at the next WorldSkills Competition in Abu Dhabi, in 2017.
Namibia, through the NTA, is a member of WSI, which is a non-political organisation that promotes skills excellence through the staging of bi-annual international skills competitions and establishing networking and sharing platforms for members to learn from and with each other. The bi-annual competitions also provide a means of exchange and comparison of competency standards in the industrial trades and service sectors of the global economy.
Beukes also highlighted that the NTA intended use the platform to give further impetus to current efforts to promote technical and vocational careers amongst young Namibians.

“The strategic policy rationale behind the exhibition component of this event is clear – Young Namibians need to make decisions about their future careers in a well-informed and well-thought-through way, linked to their interests, their capacities and their aspirations. As such, the exposition component is aimed at bringing together on a shared platform, public and private registered training providers, corporate entities and other industry stakeholders to partner the NTA in the promotion of technical and vocational careers; and in countering negative societal perceptions and stereotypes stigmatising technical and vocational training as last-choice education”, he said.

He added that the NTA expected to bring together under a single umbrella credible public and private VET providers, corporate entities and other industry stakeholders to partner it in the promotion of technical and vocational careers.
Beukes also encouraged eligible competitors and training institutions to register for participation. Application forms and detailed information can be accessible on the NTA website: www.nta.com.na or obtained upon request from the WorldSkills Namibia Secretariat at 061-2078 580. Alternatively, information can be collected from the NTA Head Office (NTA Village, Rand Street – Khomasdal) or from the nearest public Vocational Training Centre.

Posted by: In: News 23 May 2016 Comments: 0

The NTA’s Standards Assessment and Certification Council (SACC) recently approved the registration of an additional five Vocational Education and Training institutions at its meeting, held on the 26th of April 2016.

The five institutions offer a range of vocational training qualifications from the traditional occupations to civil and mechanical engineering. They are Centre for Training and Projects Development (CTPD) (Windhoek); Katutura Youth Enterprise Centre (KAYEC) (Windhoek & Ondangwa); Valombola Vocational Training Centre (Ongwediva); KLM Likuwa Mechanical Training Institute CC (Otjiwarongo); and Namibia Vocational School.

Quality Assurance Manager, Ian Gicheru told The Stakeholder that the institutions have met all the requirements and criteria, as articulated under Government Notice 300 – Regulations for the Registration of Vocational Education and Training providers. “We are witnessing good and steady progress in growing the list of credible and quality-assured training institutions”, he noted.
 
Meanwhile, as part of the ongoing effort to increase the number of registered assessment practitioners, the SACC also approved the registration of an additional 32 assessment practitioners, bringing the number of registered practitioners to 98, so far. “Whilst the latest additions to the list of registered assessment practitioners is a far cry from the numbers required to sustainably conduct assessments, I am confident that it will go a long way in helping to alleviate the shortage of qualified and approved assessment practitioners needed to develop assessment instruments, moderate assessments, as well as conduct assessments”, Gicheru explained.

The registration of assessment practitioners is an ongoing process and qualified individuals interested in being registered as such, are welcome to submit applications to the NTA’s Quality Assurance Division.